obligada > microsoft.* > microsoft.windows98

Doug (02-08-2003, 06:00)
Hello to all, and really, a lot of thanks to all ahead of time who take the
time with resect to this problem. It is quite the serious one, and I have
no idea how to go about solving it, or even what could be causing it. I'll
try to be very descriptive...for more details just ask:

The Problem: I can't play MP3s clearly on ANY player, including winamp 2,
2.09, 2,9, 3, Windows Media Player, or RealPlayer. As a matter of fact I
get bad quality on avi's as well, divx inclusive. What I mean by clearly is
that if I'm playing a song lets say, the music is loud and clear, but the
singers lyrics can hardly be heard. Basically, the song sounds as if it
were recorded in a church where the echo would drown out any words in the
song, and actually, this echo is there. It sounds really weird, and I must
admit it's very hard to describe.

The System: Pentium 200 Mhz, yes its old, but all worked fine 1 month ago
(I've posted with regards to this problem before, but then when I thought it
wen't away, it's back now...fresh after an all complete system reinstall),
32 megs or RAM. Like I said, it played mp3's fine 1 month ago, and I have a
Pentium 133Mhz with 16 megs or RAM playes MP3s just fine!

Actions taken up to now: as I stated, this problem occured before, and then
went away again. It was suggested by a few that this problem could be
caused by add-ware shipped with kazaa. When the problem again came back (2
days ago), I finally decided to re-format the entire system (fdisk, format
....the whole nine yards), then installed win95 and win 98 (clean and from
scratch). After getting win98 installed on the system, I installed the
basic drivers for sound card, network adapter, video driver, and then tried
winamp. And to my complete surprise, the same thing happens, the song/audio
file, etc.. playes really strange, with a sort of echo in the background
with the lyrics drown out by the instrmentals (almost as if the "lyric
layer" was decreased in volume while the "song layer" was increased in
volume - if that's making any sense). Then I tried Windows Media Player
6.4, and the exact same thing occurs, can't play avi's, mp3... (didn't try
other compressed audio formats). It does play cd's, but that of course is
no surprise as playing cd format cd's isn't all that difficult for a cd-rom.
I should also mention that when I play these songs on any player, my
processor activity does not rise above 5%, thus eliminating the possibility
that the old pentium is having problems keeping up with the decompression.
Also, I was suspecting the sound card, but as already mentioned, I can play
cd's just fine...

Well, that's all I can think of which seems relevent for the time being...
..

Doug
paul s (02-08-2003, 13:29)
On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 04:00:53 +0000, Doug wrote:

[..]
> were recorded in a church where the echo would drown out any words in the
> song, and actually, this echo is there. It sounds really weird, and I must
> admit it's very hard to describe.


Sounds like you got a SoundBlaster Live! or something, and the
environmental audio settings are playing up. Try installing the latest
drivers.
Doug (02-08-2003, 17:36)
This is what I get for getting a brand name computer. It's a hp 8140
pavilion,
and there are no newer drivers for it. But also, how could possibly this be
caused by sound
card settings if EVERYTHING was re-installed?

Doug
"paul s" <paulslinux> wrote in message
news:3443
[..]
Doug (02-08-2003, 17:37)
all of them. The only ones which still sound ok are the ones with no lyrics
for reasons described previously.
And it isn't the songs, because I can play them fine on both my other
machines.

Doug
"dadiOH" <xico> wrote in message
news:wjga
[..]
paul s (02-08-2003, 19:46)
On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 15:36:02 +0000, Doug wrote:

> This is what I get for getting a brand name computer. It's a hp 8140
> pavilion,
> and there are no newer drivers for it. But also, how could possibly
> this be caused by sound
> card settings if EVERYTHING was re-installed?


I assume that the re-install was done from the HP supplied CD, which
should put it back to a factory supplied state. Looks like it could be
faulty sound-hardware then.

I think that computer has the sound built into the mainboard, your best
option would be to disable it, usually done in the BIOS settings. And get
a PCI soundcard, as that machine has spare PCI slots. If you don't want to
open it up then an external USB based solution should work. Like a SB
Extigy.
Doug (02-08-2003, 20:11)
Actually, the re-install was done using win95 and win98 cd's. I found all
the drivers for
all the hp hardware sometime ago on the net and used those. Except for one
hardware piece
I was never able to find, the sound card. It's an analog devices 1815/16
and if I recall correctly
(and I haven't opened up the case in a long time), I think it's a PCI sound
card for which hp never
provided the driver explicitly. I did however at one point in time image
the entire hd (after re-installing
with the supplied cd). So yesterday I merely used that cd to locate the
ad1816.inf file on that cd
in the windows/options/cabs to install the sound card. I didn't want to
install from the recovery
cd as it re-install a bunch of stuff I don't need.

But I guess what I'd really like to know is whether it's possible for the
sound card to have become damaged
in the sense that it still plays music, great if it's in cd format, but dog
awful if in compressed format. I mean, is it
really the sound card. How and where is the mp3 converted into a format the
soundcard will recognize
and convert into analog output?

Doug
"paul s" <paulslinux> wrote in message
news:7871
[..]
dadiOH (02-08-2003, 20:36)
"Doug" <umdougmm> wrote in message
news:3100

> But I guess what I'd really like to know is whether it's possible for the
> sound card to have become damaged
> in the sense that it still plays music, great if it's in cd format, but dog
> awful if in compressed format. I mean, is it
> really the sound card. How and where is the mp3 converted into a format the
> soundcard will recognize
> and convert into analog output?


As you said, it is the sound card's job to turn digital data into analog
sound. And vice versa.

When you play a CD, the digital data (wave) is sent to the sound card and
comes out as sound.

When you play an MP3, the MP3 data is decoded to wave by the player and sent
to the sound card. Only difference twixt it and an audio CD is the
necessity of decoding the MP3's digital "shorthand" data to digital wave.

Earlier, you said that one channel seemed much louder than another. Have
you looked at a file with a wave editor to see what each channel looks like?
paul s (02-08-2003, 20:58)
On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 18:11:52 +0000, Doug wrote:

[..]
> really the sound card. How and where is the mp3 converted into a format the
> soundcard will recognize
> and convert into analog output?


The reason why CDs play OK, is because there is an *analogue* signal cable
going directly from the CD-ROM to the sound-card. Bypassing any digital
hardware, e.g. mainboard, PCI-bus, sound-card's digital portion. Whereas
MP3s etc, are been processed by the CPU, via the PCI-bus, and converted
from digital to analogue by the sound-card itself.

Yup it's perfectly possible for sound-cards to go duff, just like any
other hardware. You've virtually elimenated any software problems with the
re-install, and the fact that different media players give the same
results.
Doug (02-08-2003, 21:52)
dadiOH wrote:
[..]
> from LP/cassette plus useful tips & tricks
> about this and that...
>

This sort of work I want to avoid at all costs, afterall, I'm know
music/sound/mp3 expert. And as I said before, the files play just fine
on two of my other machines. Also, aren't songs stored on cd in analog
format already, and not wav format? I mean, when you rip a cd to make a
backup, doesn't it actually have to convert from the format on the cd to
the wab format?
Doug (02-08-2003, 21:55)
paul s wrote:
> On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 18:11:52 +0000, Doug wrote:
> The reason why CDs play OK, is because there is an *analogue* signal cable
> going directly from the CD-ROM to the sound-card. Bypassing any digital
> hardware, e.g. mainboard, PCI-bus, sound-card's digital portion. Whereas
> MP3s etc, are been processed by the CPU, via the PCI-bus, and converted
> from digital to analogue by the sound-card itself.
> Yup it's perfectly possible for sound-cards to go duff, just like any
> other hardware. You've virtually elimenated any software problems with the
> re-install, and the fact that different media players give the same
> results.

It makes so much sense that the only thing I can say is....how could I
forget about that cable. And with regards to my last question, I guess
that music stored on a regular cd is already in analog format?

Doug
Doug (02-08-2003, 21:56)
Pardon about posting to the wrong threads....mozilla's idea

DOug

paul s wrote:
[..]
paul s (02-08-2003, 23:50)
On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 14:55:09 -0500, Doug wrote:

> It makes so much sense that the only thing I can say is....how could I
> forget about that cable. And with regards to my last question, I guess
> that music stored on a regular cd is already in analog format?


The music is stored on a CD digitally but uncompressed, but is
converted to analogue within the drive, rather than via the sound-card.
paul s (03-08-2003, 00:55)
On Sat, 02 Aug 2003 14:56:00 -0500, Doug wrote:

> Pardon about posting to the wrong threads....mozilla's idea
> DOug


Was it Mozilla's fault? Your initial post was done from Outlook Express.

User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux i686; en-US; rv:1.2.1)
Gecko/20030225

10 out of 10 for your choice of OS to use with Mozilla. I did use
Mozilla for a while on newsgroups but then switched to Pan.

BTW how do your MP3s sound when played on that OS?
Doug (03-08-2003, 01:11)
I switch between the two os's, so there's posting from both.
Also, I just tried playing a wav file, and that didn't work either,
so I guess I'm going to have to invest in a new sound card. What's funny
though
is that I experienced this before and it went away for a while....

Doug
"paul s" <paulslinux> wrote in message
news:5360
[..]
dadiOH (03-08-2003, 01:15)
"Doug" <umdougmm> wrote in message
news:k4g1
> dadiOH wrote:
> > "Doug" <umdougmm> wrote in message
> > news:3100


> This sort of work I want to avoid at all costs, afterall, I'm know
> music/sound/mp3 expert. And as I said before, the files play just fine
> on two of my other machines.


It really isn't much work or difficult to interpret. A wave editor will
show you both channels and it is easy to see if the amplitude on one is
higher than the other. I mentioned it because vocals are often on one
channel with the rest on the other. Which seems to sort of tie in with your
problem of one being louder.
___________________

>> Also, aren't songs stored on cd in analog

> format already, and not wav format? I mean, when you rip a cd to make a
> backup, doesn't it actually have to convert from the format on the cd to
> the wab format?


What's on a CD (or a tape or a hard drive) is digital...a numeric
representation of the analog sound. When you rip a CD the data thereon for
each track is copied and the resultant file is given a header so that it is
recognized as a wave file.

dadiOH

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